Straight Out


Perhaps many of you know by now that my eldest daughter is the outspoken one. She is the one who knows no boundaries when it comes to social skills. Whatever one thinks and keeps in for himself (for fear of fighting with the whole island), she says out loud and clear. For this reason she is perceived as arrogant and sometimes rude. I disagree because I know that what she says isn’t meant with maliciousness or bad intent. For her what is white is white, and she will tell you it’s white, and she wants to be assured that you heard her telling you it’s white. As you can see it’s not just her stating the obvious in a blunt manner. It’s also making sure that her audience has heard and understood her. It is perhaps more the latter which makes us, her poor and silent sufferers, cringe and constantly apologize to people who either don’t know her, or perhaps more correctly, are not used to having children around. Mothers understand me when I tell them about this trait of hers. I have had some of my friends nod in embarrassed understanding. I have been told not to make a big deal out of it in front of her, and I do try to. I really try. But sometimes, in certain situations, I have snapped at her, I have apologized to people and I have become so red in the face I thought I’d actually, physically burst.

Cesca’s latest question, to anyone who looks a bit different to her in her books, is “Are you a boy or a girl?” She has asked it to men with long hair and women with short hair. She accompanies the question with a pointed finger to ensure that the recipient of her question hears her and answers her. For she does not budge before she gets an answer. And when it’s one she doesn’t agree with, she will go on. “But you have long/short hair?” If you know me or my husband you may understand how we react…

She has starting catching on any physical features which are not right in her books, and asking about them too. She has asked people why they have thin eyebrows, why their boobies are so big (“they’re huge mama’!!”) and why the boys at her school use the toilet standing up when she has to sit down. She once mentioned the words “elephant trunks” when discussing the latter, but thankfully (very much thankfully, eternally grateful and much obliged) she never again talked about it.

On one of the very few instances I let the television on E! Entertainment and a trailer for the new Caitlyn Jenner programme came on, Cesca came running to me, dragged me in front of the television set and asked me why that lady was talking in a man’s voice. “She had the flu and probably lost her voice with all the coughing”. She stared at me and back at Caitlyn, and that awkward moment passed to. I have never ever switched to E! in her presence ever again.

At the beginning of this scholastic year, she wanted to know all about babies. “How did Bettina get into your tummy mama’?”, “How did she get out of your tummy?”, “What instruments did the doctor use to get her out of your tummy?” I have to admit that these are questions I never expected from a 4-year old. I found myself at great difficulty trying to explain things to her without properly explaining them (I’m sure you get my drift), and not lying at the same time. Somehow she was satisfied with the short answers I gave her, and that uncomfortable chapter is closed. For now at least.

During a recent school holiday we went to Malta for the day and in a restaurant we went to she struck up a conversation with the waitress, a young girl of around 20 who unfortunately for her, was wearing a neon-orange top. Cesca had to ask her why she had chosen ‘such an ugly top’ to wear. The waitress told her, “You don’t like it? But why?”

“I don’t like that colour. It isn’t a very nice orange. I think you should go and change”.

“Oh, you want me to go change it?”

“Yes, I think that would be best”. (Her exact words).

The waitress looked at her, at my mum and myself (at that moment we were red on the verge of turning purple), and told us “Ommi ma, xi hlew ta’ tifla!” (Oh my, what a cute little girl!”) Better than being told off I guess.

Her latest fascination – poop. Poop and colours to be precise. She is now preaching to us her faithful audience, how snowman’s poop is white, Santa’s is red and the Minions poop blue poop. So now you know too.

These moments are (unfortunately) very frequent. Nearly daily to be precise. But as much as I sometimes foresee and dread certain situations, I would not change them for anything in the world. Cesca has a particular character, for as much as she is outspoken, appears confident and strides on without any fear, she is a true soft girl at heart. She is sensitive and kind, and these features are sometimes hidden by her blunt nature. She is the girl who can keep you entertained for hours at end, and you perhaps won’t want her near you when suffering from a headache, but I promise she will make you smile and laugh with her words. She is my own personal radio station. She tells me everything about school, who wore what, how their hair was, what they had for lunch, who wore a jacket, what coloured chair they all sat on – and I have no reason to doubt her word. Her most adorable feature is perhaps her relationship with her sister. They do fight don’t get me wrong. I do sometimes catch her pushing Bettina out of the way of her toys or telling her to go away. But I don’t worry too much about Bettina because she is our little warrior, always striding onwards and onwards, fearing very little on the way. When they start playing together, giggling together, chasing each other and laughing at something one of them does, I feel like freezing that moment and holding onto it forever. Time passes too quickly with them.

So if you’re ever one of Cesca’s recipients for certain comments, please just go with the flow. We don’t teach her to point out certain things, to talk about them, ask them and question them, but she is who she is. It is just her curiosity talking out loud. She might point out at you in the middle of the road and loudly say that you’re following us and she might ask you why you are wearing those funny shoes, and for this I apologize. Half my time with her involves apologizing to strangers. I’m trying to teach her not to be too outright and blunt when talking to strangers, but it’s proving to be a long and hard lesson. In the meantime, we are being very patient, much embarrassed and constantly apologizing. But that’s parenthood for you 🙂

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